Historical Nonfiction

fun facts, quotes, and pictures from history
Though only one-eighth Cherokee, John Ross served as a chief in the Cherokee Nation from 1828 until his death in 1866. During his tenure, Ross served as a translator for missionaries, a liaison between the Cherokee people and D.C. politicians, and owned a farm (and slaves) in North Carolina. In the early 1820s, Ross took legal action to try to prevent the forced exile of the tribe, as white settlers continued to encroach on Cherokee lands and petitioned D.C. to get rid of the Native Americans in their way.
He was president of the Cherokee Constitutional Convention of 1827 and, for the next ten years, worked with the U.S. government and his people to get assistance and justice for the Cherokee. Even though several court rulings found the Cherokee to be the rightful owners of land, they weren’t enforced. In fact, Andrew Jackson famously responded to the Supreme Court ruling on the issue, “John Marshall has made his decision, now let him enforce it.” In the end, John Ross’ efforts were in vain, and the Cherokee were forced to leave their homeland of Georgia. He lead the Cherokee to Oklahoma in 1838 on the Trail of Tears. (The portrait above is from 1866, the year of his death.)

Though only one-eighth Cherokee, John Ross served as a chief in the Cherokee Nation from 1828 until his death in 1866. During his tenure, Ross served as a translator for missionaries, a liaison between the Cherokee people and D.C. politicians, and owned a farm (and slaves) in North Carolina. In the early 1820s, Ross took legal action to try to prevent the forced exile of the tribe, as white settlers continued to encroach on Cherokee lands and petitioned D.C. to get rid of the Native Americans in their way.

He was president of the Cherokee Constitutional Convention of 1827 and, for the next ten years, worked with the U.S. government and his people to get assistance and justice for the Cherokee. Even though several court rulings found the Cherokee to be the rightful owners of land, they weren’t enforced. In fact, Andrew Jackson famously responded to the Supreme Court ruling on the issue, “John Marshall has made his decision, now let him enforce it.” In the end, John Ross’ efforts were in vain, and the Cherokee were forced to leave their homeland of Georgia. He lead the Cherokee to Oklahoma in 1838 on the Trail of Tears. (The portrait above is from 1866, the year of his death.)

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    Even white men’s courts ruled in their favour, and still it availed them nothing. Oh history, why do you have to be so...
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    I think Scott Brown needs to read this.
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    Ah is this the American Dream i keep hearing about??
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